2015-2016 Catalog 
    
    Sep 25, 2018  
2015-2016 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Elective Courses

The law school makes all reasonable efforts to offer the following electives on a periodic basis but cannot guarantee that each course or seminar will be available to all students who wish to take it during their law school careers. More precise information on the courses and seminars that will be offered in a given semester, including those not listed here, is available from the registrar during the preregistration and general registration periods.

  
  •  

    LAW - 719A Health Law: Legislative & Regulatory Process


    (2 hrs.)

    This seminar will focus on legal analysis and problem-solving in one of the most active and controversial public policy areas - health care.  While policy details and substantive law will be an important part of the course, its primary goal is for students to understand the legislative and regulatory processes by which health policy is made and implemented and to prepare them to effectively advocate a particular policy position in those settings.  The course will focus on understanding the rules governing the legislative and regulatory processes, developing analytical skills to understand the costs, benefits, and trade-offs of particular policy decisions, and understanding the political and legal dynamics of legislation and agency rulemaking. We will apply these tools to current policy debates in health care law and policy, focusing on the Affordable Care Act (primarily those provisions regulating private health insurance and making changes to the Medicare program) and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. McConagha, Bath Fall
  
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    LAW - 727 Banking & Financial Institutions: International Regulation


    (2 hrs.)

    The legal aspects of foreign exchange, eurodollars, international loan agreements, letters of credit, and aspects of U.S. and foreign banking supervision. Comizio Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 730 Land Use Planning and Practice


    (3-4 hrs.)

    The law of land use controls: Euclidian zoning, the role of the comprehensive plan, the urban planning process, variances, special exceptions, subdivision regulations, rezoning, nonconforming uses, growth controls, exclusionary zoning, inclusionary zoning remedies, civil rights challenges to zoning, permit moratoria, aesthetic zoning, historic districts, historic preservation, takings, inverse condemnation, due process challenges to zoning, and vested rights in zoning. The practice part of this course involves student presentations, moot court style, of several land use cases in simulated form before a hearing examiner. Burke, Delaney, Orens Fall
  
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    LAW - 736A International Contract Law: Technology Licensing Agreements


    (3-4 hrs.)

    This course examines transactions granting the right to use intellectual property rights and their assignment in cross-border business dealings. The course will explore international law of international agreements in general, and then progress to the international and comparative law treatment of contracts relating to the exploitation or the transfer of intellectual property rights. Examples of brand-licensing and of authors’ copyright agreements will be given. The main focus will be a detailed analysis of the transfer of technology in patent licensing agreements and assignments of patents. The course gives ample attention to problems of strategy, valuation and negotiation. The last two classes are built around a negotiation exercise in which students create a mock licensing instrument. Erauw Summer
  
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    LAW - 749 White-Collar Crime


    (2 hrs.)

    An examination of the substantive law of white-collar crime, as well as the practice, procedure, and strategy concerning federal white-collar criminal investigations and prosecutions. Topics include the definition of and theory behind white-collar crime; investigative techniques used to combat white-collar crime; grand jury law and practice; prosecutorial discretion; plea bargaining; grants of immunity, entrapment, privileges, and other common defenses; charging decisions and drafting of indictments; sentencing and the goals of punishment; and substantive law topics including conspiracy, mail and wire fraud, bribery and public corruption, false statements, perjury, obstruction of justice, computer and Internet fraud, and money laundering. Sklamberg, Tenney Fall, Spring
  
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    LAW - 750 Special Education Law


    (3 hrs.)

    Teaches how to resolve disputes arising under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) through mediation and due process procedures. Current issues in special education law are analyzed. These include the definition of an appropriate education and the concept of least restrictive environment (LRE). DuBow Fall
  
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    LAW - 763 Financial Institutions


    (2 hrs.)

    An overview of current changes in the relative roles of financial institutions (banks, savings institutions, securities firms, and other financial intermediaries) and the implications of those changes on the regulation of financial institutions. Particular attention is given to existing statutes, proposed legislation, and causes for the breakdown of the compartmentalized system of financial institutions. Comizio Fall, Spring
  
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    LAW - 773 Law and the Regulation of Science


    (3 hrs)

    Science and the fruits of scientific research play a fundamental role in the modern legal system: from the use of scientific evidence in the courtroom to regulation based on scientific findings to the ownership and exploitation of scientific discoveries. This course will explore the multifaceted relationship between science and the law, examining the ways in which scientific reasoning and the scientific method have been applied, and misapplied, to legal and policy decisions over the years. Throughout the course we will consider the differing standards for scientific and legal inquiry and whether or not these standards have proven to be compatible. In considering these questions we will analyze pivotal science-based legal decisions from a diverse selection of disciplines, beginning with the infamous trial of Galileo and including an analysis of the evolving standards for scientific evidence in the courtroom, the difficulty of proving causation in toxic torts, the regulation of hazardous substances, the balancing of personal liberty and public health, determining when a drug is safe enough to market, attempts to define fundamental aspects of the human condition, the debate over evolution in public schools and the legal and ethical issues arising from the mapping, and patenting, of the human genome. We will also explore the means by which scientific inquiry itself is fostered and regulated in the United States and abroad, covering topics including the recent policy debates over human cloning and embryonic stem cell research, as well as scientific misconduct, fraud, bias and the politicization of the scientific debate. Contreras Fall
  
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    LAW - 779 Trade Secrets


    (2 hrs)

    This course considers the law and theory of the most ubiquitous form of intellectual property protection-trade secrets. Trade secrecy can protect a much wider range of information than other forms of intellectual property (including formulas, recipes, and customer lists). The course will cover trade secret protection and the related tort of misappropriation in the employment context, because it is within that context that trade secret litigation often arises. Thus, the course will examine issues such as non-competition agreements, confidentiality, and the inevitable disclosure doctrine. Additionally, we will be discussing the increasing importance of trade secrecy for international actors. To facilitate this, we will study comparative approaches to trade secret protection (particularly Mexico, China, EU, and Japan), in addition to the U.S. approach. J. Anderson Fall
  
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    LAW - 782 Family Law: Children of LGBT Parents Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Examines some of the most cutting-edge legal issues in family law. Specifically, the course covers the following: how to define a parent and what constitutional rights parents have; custody and visitation issues arising for children born within heterosexual marriages when a parent later comes out as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender; family formation through adoption, foster parenting, sperm and egg donor insemination, and traditional and gestational surrogacy; whether/when the marital presumption of parentage applies to same-sex spouses; interstate and federal recognition of parentage; and custody and child support disputes when same-sex couples split up. Students also study demographic and social science research on children with gay or lesbian parents; public opinion research about lesbians and gay men raising children; arguments about the well-being of children that have come up in litigation, legislative efforts, and ballot initiatives about same-sex marriage and parenting; and international/comparative law on LGBT parents. Students follow pending litigation and legislation. Polikoff Fall
  
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    LAW - 788 Federal Regulatory Process


    (3 hrs.)

    An overview of the regulatory process of government administration, including the rationale for regulatory programs and reasons for ending or deregulating them, how and why Congress creates or abolishes agencies, how agencies administer their statutory programs, and alternatives to traditional regulations. Students are introduced to several government-wide procedural statutes, such as the Administrative Procedure Act and the Freedom of Information Act. A unique element of the course is the participation of more than 20 guest lecturers from the legislative and executive branches, trade associations, and the private and public interest bars. The practical aspects of the regulatory process are emphasized. Edles, Eisner,Nelson Summer
  
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    LAW - 789 International Commercial Arbitration: U.S. and Comparative Perspectives


    (3 hrs.)

    Analysis of the practical legal problems that arise in the arbitration of international commercial disputes. Drafting of arbitration agreements, selection of arbitral procedures and forums, and enforcement of arbitral awards as they arise under both domestic law (in U.S. and other major arbitration forums) and international law. Chuang, Naon, Frutos-Peterson Spring
  
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    LAW - 789S Introduction to the Practice of International Commercial Arbitration


    (1 hr.)

    designed as an introduction to the general theory and practice of international arbitration. The course includes an overview of the different institutions and rules of arbitration, institutional and ad-hoc arbitration, when to arbitrate and when to litigate, how to draft an arbitration clause, jurisdiction and powers of the arbitration tribunal, regulation of the arbitration process and enforcement of arbitral awards from a theoretical standpoint. The course also provides an introduction to the New York Convention on Recognition and Enforcement of Arbitral Awards. Summer
  
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    LAW - 790 Law of Elections: Lobbying & Political Advocacy


    2

    The overall objective of the course is to introduce students to the laws and regulations that govern political advocacy and elections in the United States, to review the evolution of these laws and explore current proposals and initiatives to reforming these laws to increase participation and address corruption and free speech issues. The course will be taught from a practitioner’s viewpoint focusing on the fundamental issues that organizations, candidates and individuals confront in complying with these laws. Schadler, Trister Fall
  
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    LAW - 795AN Animal and Wildlife Law


    3

    Nemeth, Hartl Spring
  
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    LAW - 805 Law of Information Privacy


    2 hrs.)

     

    This weekly two-hour seminar will critically examine cutting-edge information privacy law issues. Topics to be addressed include digital surveillance, the privacy implications of social networking technologies, consumer privacy, cloud computing, online behavioral advertising, and the role of anonymity in a networked world. We will compare and contrast existing legal frameworks for privacy protection in the U.S. and abroad, and we will discuss emerging privacy paradigms. We also will examine the nexus between privacy and information security through discussions of encryption, authentication, data breaches, and cybersecurity. English Teplinsky, Branderburg Spring

  
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    LAW - 808 International Business and Human Rights


    (2 hrs.)

    Examines the policies underlying various regulations of transnational business practices designed to promote respect for internationally protected human rights and explores potential conflicts between those policies and corporate business objectives. Students also analyze the appropriate limits of restrictions on overseas corporate practices. Orentlicher Spring
  
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    LAW - 809 The United States Trade Regime


    (3 hrs.)

    Provides thorough exposure to the U.S. trade regime. Course coverage includes the legal (including constitutional) framework underlying U.S. participation in trade initiatives; the practical realities of power-sharing in the trade field between the political branches of the U.S. government; the relationship between international obligations and U.S. law in the trade field; the limited but important role of the U.S. judiciary in adjudicating trade matters; the basic U.S. statutory and regulatory frameworks for regulation of imports and exports, as well as export promotion; the process by which discretionary determinations occur day-to-day in the many areas of trade regulation that are not tightly governed by law; and various federal-state issues in the trade field arising from the federal structure of the United States. While substantive WTO law is not included, the course does focus significant attention on U.S. implementation of WTO norms and commitments as well as U.S. participation, both offensively and defensively, in WTO dispute settlement proceedings. The course also covers several domestic U.S. laws and policies that are directly related to trade and concludes with a unit on practical aspects of advocacy work in the international trade field in Washington, D.C. Magnus, Nicely Fall
  
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    LAW - 810A Communications Law and Information Policy


    (2 hrs.)

    This course provides a general overview of the legal and public policy issues in domestic regulation of the communications industry. Areas of study include broadcasting, satellite, telephone, wireless, and broadband services. Phillips Fall
  
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    LAW - 810B Communications Law and Economic Regulation


    (2 hrs.)

    This course focuses on economic regulatory questions. It emphasizes policy issues involving access and entry, market structure and competition, and pricing in the regulation of broadcast and spectrum, cable television and video, telephone, and the Internet. Baker Spring
  
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    LAW - 814 The Law and Popular Culture


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Examines the way in which American law is depicted in American popular culture, specifically in mass marketed narrative film, “entertainment” television, mass journalism, and popular literary fiction. The class will focus on a few questions: (1) Why is the law such a common topic in popular culture? (2) What does the depiction of the law in our popular culture tell us about the law? (3) What does that depiction tell us about the mass culture? (4) What does it tell us about the way that the masses view the law (and how does it affect that view)? (5) What might lawyers do differently given the popular depiction of the law and lawyers? Niles, Phelps Spring
  
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    LAW - 815 Feminist Jurisprudence


    (3 hrs.)

    Provides students an opportunity to study the different strands of feminist theory. The course examines the relationship of law to the experiences of women situated differently in the world; the relationship of sex and gender as reflected in and influenced by law; cultural images of women and men that both shape and are shaped by the law; and institutional and social structures and practices that perpetuate inequality or subordination. The course also considers the interaction of feminist theories with other critical traditions, including Critical Race Theory, Social Theories of Power and Wealth, Cultural Studies, and Clinical Theory. Students may take the course for two or three credits, depending upon the scope of the project/paper they undertake. Shalleck Fall
  
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    LAW - 821A Legislation


    (2 hrs.)

    This class will present an advocate’s-eye view of how legislation is made, interpreted, implemented, and in some cases how various governmental actors work around it. I will draw upon my experience as the Legal Director at HRC and as an executive or consultant for other advocacy groups. I’ll also bring in guest speakers with Hill, advocacy, and executive-branch experience. This course will offer a practical, real-world view of how it’s done and will help you develop the skills to go out and do it yourself. Although we will examine the theories and principles various political movements say underlie their legislative preferences (e.g. states’ rights, originalism, the “constitutional conservative thought,” progressivism) this is not a theory class. We will become fluent in these ideas and learn how political actors use them as tools to achieve their goals. In particular, we will examine: 1. The legislative drafting process; 2. The role of the “fourth branch,” otherwise known as interest groups and lobbyists; 3. How a bill really becomes a law, including an introduction to parliamentary procedure, using appropriations to make law, filibusters, and the impact of our two-party system on moving legislation (spoiler alert– it makes it impossible); 4. How public perceptions of our national problems, what our Constitution means, and the people who are in charge affect how laws are drafted and whether they become law; 5. What political actors do to influence those perceptions and to message their own work; 6. How the executive branch implements (or doesn’t) existing law and uses its power to make law where none exists.

      L. Schwartz Spring
  
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    LAW - 839 Sales


    (2 hrs.)

    Covers the rules and principles of Uniform Commercial Code Article 2 governing sales of goods. It serves as both a review of major principles from first-year contracts and an introduction to commercial law and the rights and liabilities of parties to sales contracts in contemporary commercial contexts. Students consider the scope and policy objectives of UCC Article 2 as they learn to apply provisions of the code to problems involving a wide range of issues such as contract formation, warranties, and performance obligations. This course covers some aspects of the UN Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods and UCC Article 5 (letters of credit) to expose students to legal and logistical issues that arise as goods are bought and sold across national borders. The course also covers finance leases under UCC Article 2A (leases); engages students in distinguishing sales, leases, and secured loans; and introduces students to general principles and objectives of the UCC. Hughes, Snyder Fall, Spring
  
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    LAW - 840 Secured Transactions


    (3-4 hrs.)

    Examines Uniform Commercial Code Article 9 governing secured transactions. It covers the law regarding loans that are secured by personal property and introduces students to basic principles of finance. In addition to learning rules for creation, perfection, and priority of security interests, students consider social and economic effects of secured transactions domestically and abroad and the policies embodied by UCC Article 9. The course also provides exposure to types of secured transactions that are crucial to finance and to economic development, including project financing, equipment leasing, accounts receivable financing, mezzanine lending, securitization, and purchase money security interests. The course also covers general principles of bankruptcy law relating to UCC Article 9. No prior knowledge of business, finance, or economics concepts is required or expected. Students may not take LAW-615 if they take LAW-840. Hughes, Snyder, A. Jacobs Fall, Spring
  
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    LAW - 844 Advanced Environmental Law: Liability and Torts


    (3 hrs.)

    Focuses on advanced issues in liability under federal environmental law, particularly advanced issues in Superfund, and an extensive survey of common law issues of environmental torts. In addition, the course surveys issues of environmental federalism, including commerce clause and choice of law issues arising in environmental cases. Breen Spring
  
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    LAW - 846 E-Commerce Law and Drafting


    (2 hrs.)

    Focuses on the practical legal and drafting issues facing developers, licensors, licensees, and users of computer software, hardware, multimedia works, and on-line networks. Topics include drafting and modifying a variety of contracts and agreements; copyright, patent, and trade secret protection; licenses and warranties; roles and responsibilities of system operators and service providers; and the regulation of emerging technology of electronic commerce. Effross Spring
  
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    LAW - 847 Appellate Courts and Advocacy


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Covers appellate advocacy in civil cases, with an emphasis on federal courts. The bulk of the course is devoted to brief writing and oral argument techniques. Also provides an overview of appellate procedure, including jurisdiction, finality, the collateral order doctrine, interlocutory appeals, mandamus, standards of review, and issue preservation and harmless error. Bondy, A. Feldman, Gupta, Olderman, Shanker, Smith Fall, Spring
  
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    LAW - 849 Legal Drafting


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Has two primary focuses. First, it teaches the principles of preparing transactional (i.e., nonlitigation) documents. Students can expect to draft several contracts of varied length and subject matter. Second, the course provides opportunities for students to draft litigation pleadings, such as a complaint or an answer, to which they are not exposed in Legal Rhetoric (Legal Method). The emphasis is on hands-on exercises and individualized critique of student work. Prerequisite: Legal Rhetoric: Writing and Research I and II. Keith, Spratt, Risoleo, S. Shapiro, Stephenson Fall, Spring
  
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    LAW - 851 Climate Change and the Law


    (3 hrs.)

    Examines one of the most critical air and atmospheric issues of our time: global warming or climate change. Related areas, such as transboundary air pollution and ozone depletion, are also studied. Snape Fall
  
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    LAW - 855 Patent Prosecution


    (2 hrs. )

    Focuses on the realities of the U.S. Patent Office and the specific issues relating to the preparing, prosecuting, and securing of a U.S. patent. The course is based on case law from the U.S. Supreme Court, Federal Circuit, Court of Customs and Patent Appeals, and Patent Office Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences. To prosecute patents properly and represent inventors before the U.S. Patent Office, knowledge of the above court decisions and how those decisions relate to each other in terms of similarities and inconsistencies is imperative. Prerequisite: Patent Law (LAW-688). Parisi Spring
  
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    LAW - 856 Corporate Finance


    (3 hrs.)

    Introduces fundamental concepts of corporate finance, the financing of corporate activities, and the basics of the internal capital structure of the corporation. The course focuses on the legal aspects of finance and capital structure. Prerequisite: Business Associations (LAW-611). K. Anderson, A. Jacobs
  
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    LAW - 858 Aviation Law: Domestic and International Aspects


    (2 hrs.)

    Examines the legal framework for the international aviation industry, including the relevant multilateral agreements; the current debate over the future of bilateral aviation agreements and U.S. “open skies” policies; economic and competition rules governing the industry; airline alliances and other commercial arrangements; and international aviation safety, security, and liability issues. Devall Spring
  
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    LAW - 861 Seminar: Economic, Social, and Cultural Human Rights


    (2 hrs.)

    A close examination of the content and enforcement of the rights to food, water, housing, education, health, “social security,” and work, grounded in the provisions of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights. The course examines the increasing case law, both international and domestic, demonstrating the justiciability of these rights and the relationship of ESCRs to globalization and other economic issues. Wilson, Nifosi-Sutton Summer
  
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    LAW - 870 Temas Especiales en Derecho Internacional


    (3 hrs.)

    Taught in Spanish, this course addresses sources and subjects of international law, the international responsibilities of states, peaceful settlement of disputes, and rights and obligations of individuals under international law. Open only to students who have not taken public international law in English or Spanish. C. Grossman, Martin, Rodriguez-Pinzon
  
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    LAW - 870B Litigation and Advocacy in Human Rights Law


    (2 hrs)

    This course offers diverse perspectives on international and domestic advocacy in human rights and the interaction between the two spheres, the role of NGOs and the importance of international mechanisms of supervision. It addresses the role of non-state actors in the development of international human rights law and the relevance of legal mechanisms and organs of adjudication in the work of the human rights activist. (taught in Spanish) Summer
  
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    LAW - 870C Domestic Implementation of Human Rights Law


    (2 hrs)

    This course provides, an extensive look into the problems that the implementation of international obligations presents for States. The first part of the course provides a general introduction to constitutional and international law regarding international obligations of implementation and its counterparts at the domestic level. The second part examines particular challenges of implementation of international human rights obligations. The third part focuses on judicial implementation of international human rights duties by different tribunals and judges in Latin America. (taught in Spanish) Summer
  
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    LAW - 872 Regulatory Law and Policy


    (2 hrs.)

    Considers business regulation as a way to address market failures, including natural monopoly, externalities, or problems arising from costly or asymmetric information. The course focuses on pros and cons of alternative strategies for dealing with each type of market failure, including rate (price) regulation, incentive regulation (price caps), entry regulation, and deregulation in favor of competition. Although the course will employ economic analysis to evaluate how well various regulatory strategies solve market failures, it will go beyond the economics to look at the political and legal constraints limiting agency discretion and the way those constraints have changed over time. It also will analyze the costs and benefits of alternative strategies for addressing distributional issues like lifeline rates and universal service. Summer
  
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    LAW - 878 Scientific Evidence & Expert Testimony


    (3 hrs.)

    This class is a practical course designed to enrich students’ understanding of the interaction between the Federal Rules of Evidence and science in a trial setting. Through a series of exercises, students are exposed to expert scientific evidence in deposition and trial contexts. In addition to these simulation exercises, the course has an instructional component which includes presentations by guest lecturers who are specialists in various scientific fields such as forensic pathology and toxicology, digital information, and trace evidence. LAW-633 Evidence Grimm, Kreeger Fall, Spring
  
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    LAW - 885 Construction Law


    (2 hrs.)

    Construction law incorporates sophisticated legal issues with practice areas that reach across the U.S. economy. Construction matters routinely include contract law, labor relations, litigation and dispute resolution, government contracting, administrative law, and ethics. Private law firms, in house legal departments and government agencies continually hire graduates for their construction groups, yet students often have a negligible introduction to the field and are often not prepared for the nuances and scope of the work. In this class, we explore the law of the construction industry with case studies and student discussions, along with site visits and tours of subcontractor facilities S. Shapiro, Stephens Spring
  
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    LAW - 913 Trial Advocacy: Litigating in the High-Tech Courtroom


    (2 hrs.)

    Students explore through lecture, demonstration, and discussion the accumulation, organization and presentation of proof in the high-tech courtroom.  The course includes an examination of evidentiary and procedural rules as they relate to visual advocacy, computer technology, and digital graphics.  Students organize electronically stored information using CaseMap, take videotaped depositions, and prepare and present visual evidence using PowerPoint graphics, and Sanction trial presentation software.  The course culminates in a mock jury trial presided over by a Federal Judge.  LAW-633 Evidence Students must have a non-MAC laptop for use during class since the software can only be used in a Windows environment. Austrian Spring
  
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    LAW - 923A Employment Discrimination: A Case Model Approach


    (3 hrs.)

    Combines issues of employment discrimination (primarily Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964) and trial skills. The course is for students who are interested in learning about the disparate impact and treatment theories of Title VII liability and applying Title VII principles to a litigation setting. Recommended but not required: Employment Discrimination (LAW-668), Evidence (LAW-633), Civil Procedure (LAW-501, LAW-502). Ugelow, Both FAll
  
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    LAW - 925 Intellectual Property Management


    (3 hrs.)

    Encompasses a broad range of disciplines, including copyright, trademark, trade secret, commercial, and contract law. Basic principles of intellectual property (IP) formalities, infringement, licensing, and the use of copyrighted material on the Internet are addressed in the context of the problems under discussion. The course considers topics through an organizational IP audit, economic, and transaction-based approach, rather than legislative and judicial analysis. Wimbly-Martin Fall
  
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    LAW - 927 International Trafficking in Persons


    (3 hrs.)

    Examines the legal issues related to the trafficking of persons from an international and comparative perspective. Topics include forced labor, the exploitation of immigrant females for domestic services, the sale of children and irregular intercountry adoption, and the sale of wives legalized by transnational marriages. Students will consider the international trafficking prohibitions of the various international conventions, analyze legislative texts of domestic trafficking laws of selected jurisdictions worldwide, and analyze the U.S. statutes prohibiting trafficking in human beings. Chuang Spring
  
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    LAW - 929 Advanced Legal Research and Writing: Introduction to Legal Scholarship


    (2 hrs.)

    Introduces students to independent research methods that provide grounding in student-level scholarly writing and assist students in producing a high quality research-based written paper.  Blended or on-line version is available only to students who have earend 28 or more credits toward the JD degree. Students registering for the blended or on-line versions of this class must have completed at least 28 semester hours of law courses. B. Kaufman Fall, Spring, Summer
  
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    LAW - 929B Advanced Legal Research: Intellectual Property


    (1 hr.)

    This course provides the techniques and skills to research IP topics in a variety of settings, including law practice and clerking. In-class research assignments and database searching will be an integral component of the course. We will research in the topical areas of patents, trademarks, copyright, trade secrets, licensing and international IP. You will learn how to develop a research plan for different types of questions and how to identify the best and most-cost effective research sources. English Taylor Fall
  
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    LAW - 933 Civil Rights and Remedies


    (3 hrs.)

    Federal courts have for many years struggled with the use of factors like race, sex, and disability when crafting remedies for civil rights violations. When there has been discrimination against groups or persons based on race, national origin, sex, or disability, courts have had to use these factors when providing remedies for that illegal conduct. Normally, under the law, race, national origin, sex, or disability should not be a basis for determining whether a person gets a job, education, housing, or any other governmental or private benefit or service. When courts must craft remedies for discrimination that has denied people benefits or services based on race, national origin, sex, or disability, courts have had to take care in crafting such remedies so as not to affect other people unfairly based on their race, national origin, sex, or disability (or lack of disability). The course will discuss ever-changing legal landscape of the permissible uses of race, national origin, sex and disability in the context of current civil rights litigation in areas such as school desegregation, affirmative action, employment discrimination, housing discrimination, voting practices, and police misconduct, as well as laws regarding the treatment of persons with disabilities. M. Gross Fall
  
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    LAW - 962A IP Licensing and Technology Transactions


    (3 hrs.)

    Millions of patents, trademarks and copyrights are in force around the world, but very few will ever be litigated. Why, then, do companies and individuals spend scarce resources to procure these intellectual property assets? The answer, in large part, is licensing. Licensing is the principal means for deriving commercial value from intellectual property today. In this course, we will explore the practice and theory of intellectual property licensing in industries ranging from computer software, electronics and biotechnology to music, consumer goods and multimedia. In addition to licenses, we will cover related IP-based transactions such as materials transfers, joint ventures, patent pools and mergers & acquisitions. Throughout the course we will address the substantive legal doctrines that affect IP transactions including misuse, exhaustion, bankruptcy, and enforcement. The class will include several practice-oriented exercises such as contract review, analysis and negotiation. A basic understanding of intellectual property law (either through the IP survey or one or more advanced IP courses) is required.
      English Contreras Fall
  
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    LAW - 967 Immigration Issues: Employment and Family


    (2 hrs.)

    Specifically addresses family- and employment-based immigration topics and provides students with an in-depth, practice-oriented look at both the issues and the procedures involved in handling family- and employment-based immigration cases. Lawrence Fall
  
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    LAW - 968 Trial Advocacy: Evidentiary Foundations and Objections


    (3 hrs.)

    A practical course designed to enrich students’ understanding of the Federal Rules of Evidence and their application in a trial setting.  Through a series of exercises, which simulate pretrial motions and witness examinations, students develop the skills to advocate for or against the admissibility of evidence at trial.  LAW-633 Evidence and LAW-694  Criminal Trial Advocacy or LAW-695 Civil Trial Advocacy Andonian, Boals, Lippy, Winfree Fall, Spring, Summer
  
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    LAW - 969 International Trade Law II


    (2 hrs.)

    The course builds upon what has been discussed in International Trade Law I by going beyond trade in goods to international trade in services (GATs) and trade aspects of intellectual property rights (TRIPS). The focus of discussions will be the WTO system while regional trading arrangements will be in terms of their relationship with the global trading system and can serve as focus for the papers. The latter part of the course focuses on the impact of international trade rules on governance (both domestic and global) including, but not limited to, its attempt to harmonize rules with emphasis on transparency in administration of trade regulation. It examines the conflicting values that the WTO system promotes (or is intended to promote), the different interests who seek to influence the WTO mandate and, given the legacy of colonialism, the implications of such efforts for North-South relations and global harmony. Ala’i, Molinuevo Spring
  
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    LAW - 972 Bilateral Investment Treaty Arbitration


    (2 hrs.)

    The course will focus on current issues arising out of international arbitration within the context of Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs). Against the backdrop of actual arbitral decisions, the course will deal with substantive, procedural, and applicable law questions encountered in the handling of BIT arbitrations and with the contributions of this type of arbitration to the development of international law. Goodman, Brennan, Martin Faal, Spring
  
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    LAW - 972S Investor-State Arbitration


    (1 hr.)

    Provides an overview of arbitration under Investment Treaties, including NAFTA (chapter 11) arbitration and ICSID Arbitration of Disputes. The course also addresses ‘hot topics’ in Investor-State Arbitration including transparency and third party participation, denial of justice and resort to local courts, provisional measures, parallel proceeding and diplomatic protection, substantive issues in annulment proceedings, proposals for appeal mechanisms and enforcement if awards. Summer
  
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    LAW - 973 International Contracts and Sales


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Covers the many facets of international commercial sales of goods. The focus of the course is the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (Vienna 1980), generally known as the CISG, with comparisons to domestic systems in both the common law (especially Uniform Commercial Code Article 2) and the civil law. The class also covers the payment and credit terms typical in such sales, with particular attention to the laws and practices relating to letters of credit, as well as some treatment of security interests or reservation of title. The course addresses carriage of the goods and the risk of loss to them. Snyder Fall
  
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    LAW - 976 Business Immigration Law


    (3 hrs.)

    An in-depth review of the law, policies, and procedures regulating the entry of foreign nationals into the United States for employment purposes. Students will examine the various avenues and challenges under existing law for U.S. employers to hire and retain foreign national workers in light of periodic national personnel shortages, an increasingly global labor market, and pressures for legislative reform. Students will also familiarize themselves with the federal agencies which regulate the allowance of temporary and permanent immigration benefits in business, employment, and investment contexts and develop insight into the legal processes and procedures for obtaining those benefits. The course will also address related issues, such as post-9/11 security policies, undocumented workers, employer compliance with federal employment eligibility verification requirements, and, to a lesser extent, the intersection of immigration and employment law. Asaad Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 980 Advanced International Law and Peace Negotiations


    (3 hrs.)

    Provides students with an opportunity to explore the legal intricacies of peace negotiations, post-conflict constitutions, and war crimes prosecutions. The particular cases examined by students are constantly updated to ensure they are dealing with contemporary conflicts. Specific issues covered include ceasefires; human rights; refugee law; state structure; power sharing; fiscal devolution; demobilization and reintegration; reconciliation; international tribunals; peacekeeping; and self-determination. P. Williams Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 982S Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration


    (1 hr)

    Provides an overview of international commercial arbitration focusing on key issues: the different institutions and rules of arbitration, institutional and ad hoc arbitration, when to arbitrate and when to litigate, how to draft an arbitration clause, jurisdiction and role of arbitration tribunal, and regulation of the arbitration process and enforcement of arbitral awards. Summer
  
  •  

    LAW - 984A Advanced Trial Advocacy: Homicide Prosecution


    (2 hrs.)

    This course focuses on a prosecutor’s role in a gang homicide case from the discovery of the victim up to and through prosecution and sentencing of co-defendants.  Students are exposed to the day-to-day work of local prosecutors and essential skills and motions filed by prosecutors in the context of a gang homicide case.   LAW-508 Criminal Procedure I, LAW-633 Evidence, and one of the following: LAW-684 Criminal Trial Advocacy, LAW-695 Civil Trial Advocacy or Criminal Justice Clinic. Acosta, Wennar Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 984B Advanced Trial Advocacy: Challenges and Obligations of the Prosecutor


    (2 hrs)

    This course seeks to give students an understanding about the daily responsibilities of a prosecutor and the typical challenges that prosecutors face in practice. Topics covered in this course include ethical rules governing the conduct of prosecutors, grand jury practice, analysis required in deciding to prosecute a case, and rules governing discovery requests, as well as other prosecution related trial preparation and presentation issues.  This course is a combination of theory and practice.  Students read cases, statutes and articles defining the prosecutorial role and constitutionally required practices and work through in class exercises. LAW-508 Criminal Procedure I Acosta, Wennar Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 988 Drafting Wills and Trusts


    (2 hrs.)

    The primary focus of this course is the drafting of dispositive documents, wills and trusts instruments. While substantive law will be considered to the extent necessary to put the drafting in context, the course will concentrate more on the skills of drafting to make the client’s intent clear, learning how to accomplish a testator’s or grantor’s goals through the drafting of documents. Abravanel Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 993 Adoption Law Policy and Practice


    (3 hrs)

    Examines the current legal regime governing both domestic and intercountry adoption. It will also delve into historical and current policy debates in the field, and explore how the current practice of domestic and intercountry adoption adheres to, and deviates from, the purposes of the laws and regulations applicable to the field. The course will also explore issues of human rights and children’s rights, exploring whether current law protects the interests of the parties, and how adoption necessarily involves complex issues of class, race, gender, and economic disparities. This course is practical and valuable for those who wish to practice family law, as well as those who serve populations of women that would consider placing children for adoption, and international populations that might be at risk of exploitation. Maskew Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 994 eDiscovery


    (2 hrs.)

    The ubiquitous use of computers, the Internet and Internet-related technology has dramatically changed the litigation landscape.  Information sources are growing rapidly, including social media, voicemail, instant messaging, removable media, blogs, smart phones, etc.  The courts have focused responsibility for solving the problems, and complying with the requirements of discovery (“eDiscovery”), squarely on the shoulders of litigation counsel.  This course provides a basic understanding of the legal and practical parameters of eDiscovery and electronic case management.  This skills-based course examines the legal and technological issues surrounding the use of electronically stored information during the litigation process.  Students conduct mock interviews of company CIOs and brief and argue motions involving eDiscovery issues.  Students also review and evaluate efforts made by professional groups and the courts to create reasonable parameters allowing parties to comply with their discovery obligations and ethical responsibilities while implementing a fundamental change in the adversary system from one of confrontation to one of cooperation. Austrian, Racich Fall, Spring


Elective Seminars

The law school makes all reasonable efforts to offer the following electives on a periodic basis but cannot guarantee that each course or seminar will be available to all students who wish to take it during their law school careers. More precise information on the courses and seminars that will be offered in a given semester, including those not listed here, is available from the registrar during the preregistration and general registration periods.

  
  •  

    LAW - 700 Administrative Law and Regulations Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Selected problems of administrative law, covering both regulations and programs administered by various federal agencies. Popper Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 701 Advanced Issues in Criminal Law Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

    An in-depth analysis of selected problems associated with the law of crimes. Robbins, B. Smith Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 704 Business Planning


    (3 hrs.)

    Covers the substance and practical applications of such areas of law as business associations, taxation, and securities regulation. Students will consider issues faced by business lawyers, including ethical and other professional responsibility concerns, in advising clients in the formation, financing, operation, and ultimate disposition of business entities. Particular attention will be given to the tax aspects of choice of entity, financing, and operational issues. Prerequisite: Business Associations (LAW-611). Recommended: a tax course (LAW-647 or LAW-639 or LAW-644) and Securities Regulation (LAW-612). Eule Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 705 Advanced Civil Rights Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

    An analysis of contemporary constitutional problems in areas of civil rights and liberties. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law (LAW-503). Schwartz Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 706 Advanced Civil Procedure: Complex Litigation Seminar


    (2 hrs.)

    Using statutes and the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure as tools in civil litigation. Topics covered include strategy, purposes, and tactics of class action litigation; shareholder derivative suits; injunctions, temporary restraining orders, and stays; appealable orders, interlocutory appeals under 28 U.S.C. Section 1292 (b), writs of mandamus and prohibition; civil motions practice; judicial panel on multidistrict litigation; and award of attorneys’ fees to prevailing parties by statute, from a common fund or under Common Benefit Doctrine. Coleman, Karl Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 707 Advanced Constitutional Law Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Selected problems in constitutional law. Includes consideration of major recent decisions, as well as debates about modern constitutional theory. Raskin, Schwartz, Ahranjani, Wermiel Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 707A The Supreme Court


    (2-3 hrs.)

    The focus of the course is the study of the Supreme Court as an institution: how the justices shape their docket and decide the cases. The aim is to provide a thorough understanding of the Court’s processes so that students may evaluate the way the justices do their work, what influences and pressures matter, when compromise is necessary and how that is accomplished, and what impact these factors have on substantive legal outcomes. LAW-503 Constitutional Law English Wermiel Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 708 Advanced Criminal Procedure Seminar


    (2 hrs.)

    Examines the historical development and practical impact of race and politics on the criminal justice system from initial street encounters with the police to the imposition of the death penalty. Selected case profiles, in-depth documentaries, and other materials are used to explore the problems of wrongful convictions and other miscarriages of justice. Students discuss and evaluate a variety of legislative and judicial reforms designed to eliminate and remedy the problems of racism in the criminal justice system. Davis, Jones, Roberts Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 708B Plea Bargaining


    (3 hrs.)

    The vast majority of criminal convictions - more than ninety percent - come not from a public trial verdict, but rather after a closed negotiation process ending in a guilty plea.  In this course, Students examine plea bargaining and guilty plea jurisprudence, theory, and practice.  They consider debates over the utility, coercive aspects, and constitutionality of plea bargaining and guilty pleas.  Students also explore the role of the prosecutor, defender, and judge in plea bargaining, including ethical considerations for these institutional actors.  Other topics include the collateral consequences of guilty pleas; procedural justice and cognitive bias in the plea process; and negotiation theory in the criminal context.  The class will visit criminal court to observe guilty pleas, and all students will also plan for, conduct, and critique a recorded plea negotiation simulation. 
      Roberts, Jahn, Lippy Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 712A Human Rights Litigation Clinical Seminar


    (2 hrs.)

    Provides students with the opportunity to participate in litigation involving myriad issues of law that synthesize and build on first-year doctrinal courses and require creative analysis and complex research. Work centers on several pro bono human rights cases, and students will draw upon torts, contracts, property, constitutional law, evidence, international law, civil procedure, federal courts, and criminal law, among other areas. Instructor permission required. Instructor permission required Human Rights Litigation Fieldwork (LAW-712B) Beydoun Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 715 Disability and the Law Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Explores the ways in which the legal system deals (and has dealt) with people with disabilities in such areas as employment, education, housing, institutionalization, transportation, and health. Students look at historical and contemporary depictions of people with disabilities, case law, and statutes, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Fair Housing Act Amendments of 1988. Dinerstein Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 716 Environmental Litigation Seminar


    (2 hrs.)

    The procedural, substantive, and tactical considerations in environmental litigation. Squire Spring, Summer
  
  •  

    LAW - 719 Selected Topics in Health Law Seminar


    (2 hrs.)

    Considers legal, ethical, and public policy problems posed by developments in health care financing, allocation, and delivery. Seminar topics include bioethics, fraud and abuse in the health care industry, federal reform of health policy, health care dispute resolution, health care transactions, managed care, medical liability, health law legislative and regulatory process, and public health law. Fall, Spring, Summer
  
  •  

    LAW - 719B Health Care Fraud and Abuse: Contracting and Compliance


    (3 hrs.)

    Examines health care fraud and abuse laws from the perspectives of health care contracting and health care compliance. Emphasis is placed on the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, Stark Law and False Claims Act, but state law issues also are considered. In addition, the course reviews sanctions and governmental enforcement initiatives. Students apply health care fraud and abuse laws to sample health care contracts. The course also considers the complexities and challenges that arise in developing and maintaining an effective compliance program for health care organizations. Kung Scielzo Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 719C Health Care Mergers and Acquisitions


    (2 hrs)

    Examines health care mergers and acquisitions by dissecting a transaction from start to finish. Emphasis is placed on the unique challenges of doing deals in the health care industry. Students apply the studied principles to sample transaction documents. Bertram Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 721 Law of the Sea Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Combines a traditional overview of the law of the sea with a focus on contemporary issues such as environmental preservation, fisheries management, public enjoyment, and resource exploitation. To achieve this balance, the course will explore a number of case studies, including the Spratley Island dispute involving China, Vietnam, Malaysia, and the Philippines; the Caspian Sea hydrocarbon dispute; and the Malaysian-Indonesian dispute recently submitted to the International Court of Justice. Particular emphasis will be placed on the interrelationship between international law and policy, noting how law shapes policy outcomes and how policy choices shape the development of law. Orellana, Snell Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 725A International Protection of Human Rights Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Explores the interrelationships between U.S. and international law; contested or ambiguous moral values; and U.S. foreign policy ends, means, and processes as they affect efforts to defend and promote human rights. The course is designed to provide information on the substantive norms of human rights, the philosophic basis for the concept of rights and the leading points of controversy about the existence or character of certain rights that appear in conventional enumerations, the subtle and not-so-subtle ways in which ideological and material interests influence the definition and enforcement of rights, and the ways in which policy makers attempt to reconcile the demand for human rights enforcement with more traditional foreign policy objectives. C. Grossman, Martin, Rodriguez-Pinzon Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 725B Gender, Cultural Difference, and International Human Rights Seminar


    (3 hrs.)

    Examines the application of international law to religious and cultural practices that have an impact on women’s rights. The course focuses on the personal status laws governing rights in the family, legal capacity, and inheritance in a number of countries. Students consider concepts of culture in international law and the scope of laws protecting the right to engage in religious and cultural practices; concepts of gender equality in international law; and feminist analyses of the ways in which gender, race, class, and other factors intersect with religion and culture to shape women’s de jure and de facto rights, with an emphasis on analyses by women in developing countries and women of color in the United States. Students also look at concepts of cultural difference, race, and gender in approaches to the practice of female circumcision and the concept of moral consensus as a cultural construct underlying restrictions on lesbian and gay rights in the United States and Europe. Examples include Islamic law, Hindu law, customary law in selected African countries, Jewish law, and Christian law as reflected in Irish constitutional law and canon law as incorporated in various legal systems. H. Harris Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 725R International Justice for Human Rights Violations


    (2 hrs)

    This course explores human rights accountability from different angles. First, the course examines the development of amnesty laws under international human rights law, the duty to investigate and prosecute, and the interaction between domestic and international human rights principles and procedures. Second, the course explores the advantages of universal jurisdiction. The course addresses development of international criminal tribunals. Overall, this course will examine the historical evolution of the notion of human rights accountability, and the related tensions between the pursuit of justice and realpolitik. Brody, Andersen Summer
  
  •  

    LAW - 726 International Financial Institutions Seminar


    (2 hrs.)

    Study of the principal international financial institutions, including the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Burger Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 731 Real Estate Planning Seminar


    (3 hrs.)

    Examines business planning and workouts for real estate transactions and contract, corporate, tax, bankruptcy, and real property law. The course is conducted through the problem method, with all problems centering on commercial transactions involving shopping centers, office buildings, or subdivisions. Burke, Horowitz Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 737 International Institutions and Environmental Protection Seminar


    (3 hrs.)

    Environmental protection is promoted by many international institutions yet inhibited by others. This course examines the organizations including the UN, NGOs, and regional and transnational corporate institutions. Trade institutions also are examined. Special emphasis is given to the new Sustainable Development Commission and other institutions relevant to the recent UN Conference on Environment and Development. Hunter Summer
  
  •  

    LAW - 738 International Courts Seminar


    (3 hrs.)

    Considers the role of international courts in developing international law. Students study the evolution and structure of international courts and arbitral tribunals and examine how those bodies discern and apply principles of substantive international law. Particular reference will be made to traditional sources in international law, such as treaties, custom, general principle of law, and secondary sources. Heywood, Brantley Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 739 Advanced Human Rights Seminar


    (3 hrs.)

    Considers the scope of a selected group of relevant human rights recognized in international conventions and analyzes how the protections afforded by those treaties operate in actual practice. Students analyze the case law developed by international supervisory bodies, such as the Human Rights Committee, under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the Inter-American Commission and Court of Human Rights, under the American Convention on Human Rights, and the European Court of Human Rights, under the European Convention on Human Rights. Also, we will study selected decisions of domestic courts that apply international human rights law or raise human rights issues relevant for the topics covered in class. Next, they study the scope of the restrictions applicable to human rights obligations as well as the doctrines of deference applied by international bodies when supervising state compliance with those obligations. As part of this section, students focus on the notion of state of emergency and derogation of human rights obligations. Third, they analyze the scope of core rights protected by civil and political rights conventions, namely the right to liberty and security of person, the right not to be subjected to torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment, the right to a remedy and the right to a fair trial. As part of the existing challenges to the protection of human rights, students explore the concept of universal jurisdiction and study the relationship between international human rights law and international humanitarian law, particularly in the context of the ongoing war against terrorism. Finally, students consider the scope of protection afforded to certain vulnerable groups.  

     


      Goldman

  
  •  

    LAW - 739A Human Rights and Terrorism Seminar


    (3 hrs.)

    Examines the impact that key laws and policies adopted in the US and other countries after the 9/11 attacks have had globally on the rule of law, international human rights and, where applicable, international humanitarian law, (the law of armed conflict). Among the topics that students will explore are: Can respect for human rights actually assist counter-terrorism efforts? Are past experiences with terrorism relevant to the contemporary terrorist threat? Should terrorist suspects ever be subjected to torture? What are the significance and consequences of the US War on Terror? Have the enhanced powers of intelligence services world-wide and intelligence sharing contributed to serious human rights violations, such as torture? What impact have counter-terrorism measures had on the civilian justice system? Should military or special courts try terrorist suspects? The assigned reading are global in scope, drawing on cases from, inter alia, the US, the United Kingdom and human rights treaty bodies, such as the European Court of Human Rights, and the reports and publications of Human Rights Watch, the International Commission of Jurists and other respected NGOs. Goldman
  
  •  

    LAW - 739C European Human Rights Law


    (2 hrs)

    Reviews the individual petition system and mechanisms for supervision of state obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), including the functioning of the European Court of Human Rights and the role of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe in supervising the enforcement of the Court’s judgments of the Court. The course focuses on the role of legal practitioners in the implementation and application of this regional treaty and analyzes the extent to which norms of international human rights have penetrated the domestic law of the state parties to the ECHR. Summer
  
  •  

    LAW - 739D Women and International Human Rights Law


    (2 hrs)

    This course addresses the challenges of achieving the international legal protection of the human rights of women. It reviews how international and regional human rights conventions, especially the American Convention on Human Rights, have been applied to prevent, punish and remedy the violations of women’s rights in different tribunals. It examines how the norm of the prohibition of all forms of discrimination against women has been applied, and how it might be more effectively applied in particular sectors. It explores how feminist theories, empirical data, and narratives might be used to expose women’s experiences of injustice. The course aims to go beyond a formalistic understanding of international legal obligations in order to examine different approaches to fostering compliance with the human rights of women in different cultures and religious traditions. Summer
  
  •  

    LAW - 739S Human Rights and Development


    (2 hrs)

    these fields in theory, applied research and practice. Many bilateral and multilateral aid organizations, non-governmental organizations and development, workers now profess to implement “rights-based approaches” to development, which have been welcomed in some sectors, but not all. There will be a strong institutional focus to the course, with a close look at the roles and functions of United Nations development agencies, international development and financial institutions including the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, transnational corporations and business entities, set against political debates on human rights and development in inter-governmental bodies. Finally, consideration will be given to accountability mechanisms at global, national and local levels, where innovative and practical synergies between human rights and development might be identified. Summer
  
  •  

    LAW - 742 Poverty Law


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Focuses on the theory and practice of poverty law.  The class begins with a consideration of what is poverty and how poverty is measured.  It then explores how antipoverty policy in the United States has changed over time as well as some of the significant themes of poverty law, including deserving vs. undeserving poor, individual vs.collective approaches, in-kind vs. direct forms of support, and the power and limits of the law as a tool.  The class covers the most significant poverty law cases and the move from federal to state litigation strategies.  A range of antipoverty programs and topics:  welfare, work housing health, edfduation, riminalization of poverty, access to justice, antipoverty market approaches, and human rights also are covered. English Rosser Fall
  
  •  

    LAW - 743 Regulation of Derivatives Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

    Current problems in laws and regulations affecting derivatives trading in financial markets, including exchange-traded and over-the-counter transactions. Topics include the interaction of securities and commodity trading regulations, regulation of market participants, powers of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to regulate and enforce compliance with the laws and regulations governing derivatives, developments in self-regulation, and private rights of action. Ritter Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 745 Pension and Employee Benefit Law Seminar


    (3 hrs.)

    Provides an introduction to the federal regulation of the pension system and evaluates the policy underpinnings of the current system of pension regulation. It will focus on the legal rights established to protect individual employees as well as the requirements designed to produce equitable treatment for rank and file employees. Although most of the applicable requirements are contained in the tax law, we also examine certain nontax questions, such as issues of age and sex discrimination in the pension system, medical care for retirees, and fiduciary responsibilities under ERISA. Abramowitz Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 746 Advanced Tax Policy and Problems Seminar


    (2 hrs.)

    Selected tax problems, including pension plans, foreign tax problems, advanced corporate tax, exempt organizations, tax policy, administration, estate planning, and problems of legal research unique to the field of taxation. Prerequisite: Federal Personal Income Tax (LAW-647). Leff, Pike Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 775 Labor & Migration in the Global Economy


    (3 hrs.)

    Explores the dynamics of labor migration in the global economy, and efforts by governments and international institutions to manage this migration. The course will examine and assess diverse law and policy interventions designed to maximize the potential benefits and minimize the related costs of labor migration for countries (of origin and of destination) and the migrants themselves. The course begins with an in-depth look of the patterns and practices of global labor migration into both formal and informal labor sectors, focusing on the emigration push and immigration pull factors that lead individuals to migrate and governments to facilitate and encourage the migration. The course also looks to the growing role of recruitment agencies in facilitating the migration in response to increased border controls worldwide and its impact on the conditions of migrant work. Having established an understanding of the dynamics of global labor migration, the course examines international, regional, and national legal frameworks targeting migrant work, with an eye to identifying the gaps in coverage and implementation challenges. The course then assesses alternative law and policy interventions proposed and implemented to better manage labor migration and protect migrant workers. The course will include a strong gender perspective on these issues, analyzing the causes of the increasing feminization of migration for work, including the feminization of poverty and the social construction of demand for migrant women’s labor. Chuang Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 777 Legislative Practice Seminar


    3


    A seminar focusing on the federal legislative process and the elements of policy, law, and politics that drive that process, taught by faculty members with extensive background in the federal legislative and policy arena. The seminar  also emphasizes key skills vital to success in the legislative arena, including research, writing, legislative drafting, negotiation, and oral presentations.
      Yeomans, Flug Fall, Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 783 Property & the Environment Seminar


    (2-3 hrs.)

     

    This course examines the law of property and its relationship to the environment. Students will be challenged to read and think in a sustained way about property and its relationship to environmental concerns. The course is divided into three parts: (i) property and the social or cultural environment, (ii) property and the built environment, and (iii) property and the natural environment. English Hughes Spring

  
  •  

    LAW - 812 Elder Law: Policy and Practice Seminar


    (2 hrs.)

    Explores issues confronting the elder law practitioner and examines policy issues concerning law and aging in America. Students acquire a basic working knowledge of various elder law issues, including planning for incapacity, guardianship, social security, Medicare coverage, and long-term care planning. The seminar also focuses on public policy issues, such as autonomy versus the need for protective action, death and dying, and the extent of medical and income protection for the senior population. Abravanel Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 813 Comparative Environmental Law Seminar


    (3 hrs.)

    Presents different approaches for protecting the environment through national environmental legislation. Emphasis is given to the major components of any modern environmental legal system, including, for example, environmental impact assessment, access to environmental information, science-based environmental standards, and implementation of international agreements including Agenda 21. The approach will be practical, designed to emphasize the policy trade-offs inherent in designing and implementing environmental law and policy. Will draw upon examples from civil and common law systems as well as from developing and industrialized countries. Hunter Spring
  
  •  

    LAW - 817 Advanced Issues in International Trade Seminar


    (3 hrs.)

    Considers trade law as an instrument for economic development. The focus primarily is on trade problems and policy in the United States, comparing it with trade law and policy in other countries. Levinson Fall, Spring
 

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